As of this afternoon, May 12, Tyler and John have bicycled 2583 miles.  John and Kipp have walked 362 miles.  

The name “Indiana”  means land of the Indians, which refers to the large number of Indians/ Native Americans who lived throughout the state when the first European settlers arrived.  In researching Indiana’s history we found the website for Conner Prairie, which is the Smithsonian Museum Institution’s only Indiana affiliate.  To learn more, you can use this link to the Conner Prairie website, which, along with visiting the park in person, will offer you a wide swath of Indiana and American history.  http://www.connerprairie.org/About-Us/Who-We-Are.aspx

For a taste of the depth of learning offered by Conner Prairie, here is a link to a page called “Native Americans in Indiana: Resistance and Removal.”  http://www.connerprairie.org/Learn-And-Do/Indiana-History/America-1800-1860/Native-Americans-In-America.aspx  We hope you will read this important story.  

In 1816 Indiana became the 19th state, the second state in the Northwest Territory to do so.  It was the home state of President Benjamin Harrison, who was elected to the presidency in 1888.  Although he lost the popular vote, Harrison gained a majority in the Electoral College and served one term. http://www.whitehouse.gov/about/presidents/benjaminharrison

Indiana is a very flat state with the lowest elevation being 320 feet above sea level and the highest elevation being 1,257 feet above sea level.

The state bird is the cardinal, the state tree the tulip and the state flower the peony.     

“Agriculture plays a vital role in the economic stability of Indiana… The flat areas of Miami soils are used mainly for corn, soybeans, or winter wheat… The steeper areas are used as pasture, hayland, or woodland…Indiana is the second largest producer of popcorn in the nation.”  Please use this link to learn more: http://www.agclassroom.org/kids/stats/indiana.pdf      

We were struck by the number of wind farms we saw as we drove from south to north through windy Indiana!  “Indiana wind turbines are giant monsters of steel. How big are Indiana wind turbines? Those you see around I-65 in Northwest Indiana are around 300 feet tall. Each blade of an Indiana wind turbine is 120+ feet and weighs 7 tons. Yes, that’s for  each blade.”  Here is a link to read a story and watch a video about wind farms in West Central Indiana.    http://www.wlfi.com/dpp/living_green/Indiana-wind-farms-nationally-recognized   As with everything, we know you will find much more to learn about this energy resource.

As with each state, there is unique history and unique current life in Indiana.  We believe that learning about the life in each state will enrich yours!  We know it has enriched ours.  

 

 

1 Comment for this entry

  • Tamara Hogsett
    May 17th, 2012

    Congrats John and Tyler on 2583 miles!

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